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Indigenous Lifeways Podcast

The Indigenous Lifeways podcast series is produced by the Tomaquag Museum, located in the state of Rhode Island USA, which is dedicated to telling the story of the First Peoples of this land, highlighting the Narragansett as well as other Eastern Woodland Coastal Tribal Nations. Our podcasts features educational content which teaches different aspects of Native American history and culture through the use of art, music, and stories. Viewers will learn from the vast experience and knowledge of our cultural educators and producers. Our content is presented in a fun and entertaining way. You will learn a variety of new things from watching weekly episodes of our podcast.
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Nov 7, 2016

No Braver Men takes a look at the 1st Regiment of rhode Island, and how Indigenous people as well as people of color impacted that regiment who fought in the revolutionary war.

This talk is hosted by Loren Spears, Executive Director at the Tomaquag Museum in Rhode Island, and Robert Geake, Rhode Island historian, and is a board member of the Cocumscussoc Association which manages the Smith’s Castle museum in Rhode Island.

 

This is EPISODE 4 of this podcast series, and is produced by Tomaquag Museum. (Please see: www.Tomaquaguseum.org/podcasts for more episodes on indigenous culture)This series is sponsored in part by:

The University of Rhode Island office of the President and the office of Community, equity and Diversity.

The Rhode Island Indian Council

O’Neil’s Package Store

The Mohegan Tribe

The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation

Mashantucket PRXN

Oct 31, 2016

 

No Braver Men takes a look at the 1st Regiment of Rhode Island, and how Indigenous people as well as people of color impacted that regiment who fought in the revolutionary war.

This talk is hosted by Loren Spears, Executive Director at the Tomaquag Museum in Rhode Island, and Robert Geake, Rhode Island historian, and is a board member of the Cocumscussoc Association which manages the Smith’s Castle museum in Rhode Island.

 

This is EPISODE 3 of this podcast series, and is produced by Tomaquag Museum. (Please see: www.Tomaquaguseum.org/podcasts for more episodes on indigenous culture)This series is sponsored in part by:

The University of Rhode Island office of the President and the office of Community, equity and Diversity.

The Rhode Island Indian Council

O’Neil’s Package Store

The Mohegan Tribe

The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation

Mashantucket PRXN

Oct 24, 2016

No Braver Men takes a look at the 1st Regiment of rhode Island, and how Indigenous people as well as people of color impacted that regiment who fought in the revolutionary war.

This talk is hosted by Loren Spears, Executive Director at the Tomaquag Museum in Rhode Island, and Robert Geake, Rhode Island historian, and is a board member of the Cocumscussoc Association which manages the Smith’s Castle museum in Rhode Island.

 

This is EPISODE 2 of this podcast series, and is produced by Tomaquag Museum. (Please see: www.Tomaquaguseum.org/podcasts for more episodes on indigenous culture)This series is sponsored in part by:

The University of Rhode Island office of the President and the office of Community, equity and Diversity.

The Rhode Island Indian Council

O’Neil’s Package Store

The Mohegan Tribe

The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation

Mashantucket PRXN

Oct 18, 2016

No Braver Men takes a look at the 1st Regiment of Rhode Island, and how Indigenous people as well as people of color impacted that regiment who fought in the revolutionary war.

This talk is hosted by Loren Spears, Executive Director at the Tomaquag Museum in Rhode Island, and Robert Geake, Rhode Island historian, and is a board member of the Cocumscussoc Association which manages the Smith’s Castle museum in Rhode Island.

 

This is EPISODE 1 of this podcast series, and is produced by Tomaquag Museum. (Please see: www.Tomaquaguseum.org/podcasts for more episodes on indigenous culture)This series is sponsored in part by:

The University of Rhode Island office of the President and the office of Community, equity and Diversity.

The Rhode Island Indian Council

O’Neil’s Package Store

The Mohegan Tribe

The Mashantucket Pequot Tribal Nation

Mashantucket PRXN

Aug 16, 2016

In this episode of Indigenous Lifeways, we examine historical uses of rivers for travel by Indigenous people. This lecture is presented by Tomaquag Museum's Executive Director, Lorén Spears.

Visit our website at:http://www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Tomaquag Museum

390 A Summit Rd

Exeter, Rhode Island,02822

(401)491-9063

 

 

Aug 2, 2016

Hōkūle‘a and Hikianalia, are two Polynesian voyaging canoes, who are sailing across Earth’s oceans to join and grow a global movement toward a more sustainable world.

The Hōkūle‘a outrigger canoe made a stop in Rhode Island, and in the tradition of Canoe societies, asked permission of the Narragansett nation to come ashore and visit with nation members. This episode of the Indigenous Lifeways podcast introduces you to the crew of the Hōkūle‘a and explains a little bit about the mission of the voyage that is underway.


Read more about the Polynesian Voyaging Society on their website.


To learn more about Tomaquag Museum, Rhode Islands ONLY Native American Museum, visit our website: http://www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Jun 26, 2016

Tomaquag Museum has won the Institute of Museum and Library Services award, the United States highest honor given to museums and libraries for service to the community. For 22 years, the award has celebrated institutions that respond to societal needs in innovative ways, making a difference for individuals, families and their communities. The award will be presented at a ceremony event in Washington, D.C.

"Congratulations to the Tomaquag Museum on bringing this prestigious national honor to Rhode Island,” said Senator Sheldon Whitehouse. “I was proud to nominate the Museum for its impressive work preserving Rhode Island’s Native American culture. The Museum is an exceptional resource that I hope will honor the important heritage of Rhode Island’s indigenous people for generations to come.” Said Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D) Rhode Island.

“This year’s National Medal recipients show the transforming role of museums and libraries from educational destinations to full-fledged community partners and anchors,” said Dr. Kathryn K. Matthew, director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. “We are proud to recognize the extraordinary institutions that play an essential role in reaching underserved populations and catalyzing new opportunities for active local involvement.”

This podcast episode is part 1 of the Ceremony that took place in Washington DC.

About Tomaquag Museum:
Tomaquag Museum, Rhode Island’s only museum entirely dedicated to telling the story of the Indigenous Peoples was established in 1958. It is a Native-led nonprofit museum. Tomaquag serves as a cultural bridge between the past, present and future as well as a facilitator between the Indigenous communities and the diverse world.

Through our unique collection, lectures, tours, off-site programs, and arts & educator workshops, we educate the public regarding Native history, culture, arts, current events, and environmental issues. The Museum is visited each year by artists, researchers, students, and travelers from across the United States and throughout the world.

For more information, please visit www.tomaquagmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

 

Jun 19, 2016

Tomaquag Museum has won the Institute of Museum and Library Services award, the United States highest honor given to museums and libraries for service to the community. For 22 years, the award has celebrated institutions that respond to societal needs in innovative ways, making a difference for individuals, families and their communities. The award will be presented at a ceremony event in Washington, D.C.

"Congratulations to the Tomaquag Museum on bringing this prestigious national honor to Rhode Island,” said Senator Sheldon Whitehouse.  “I was proud to nominate the Museum for its impressive work preserving Rhode Island’s Native American culture. The Museum is an exceptional resource that I hope will honor the important heritage of Rhode Island’s indigenous people for generations to come.” Said Senator Sheldon Whitehouse (D) Rhode Island.

“This year’s National Medal recipients show the transforming role of museums and libraries from educational destinations to full-fledged community partners and anchors,” said Dr. Kathryn K. Matthew, director of the Institute of Museum and Library Services. “We are proud to recognize the extraordinary institutions that play an essential role in reaching underserved populations and catalyzing new opportunities for active local involvement.”

This podcast episode is part 1 of the Ceremony that took place in Washington DC.

About Tomaquag Museum:
Tomaquag Museum, Rhode Island’s only museum entirely dedicated to telling the story of the Indigenous Peoples was established in 1958. It is a Native-led nonprofit museum. Tomaquag serves as a cultural bridge between the past, present and future as well as a facilitator between the Indigenous communities and the diverse world.

Through our unique collection, lectures, tours, off-site programs, and arts & educator workshops, we educate the public regarding Native history, culture, arts, current events, and environmental issues. The Museum is visited each year by artists, researchers, students, and travelers from across the United States and throughout the world.

For more information, please visit www.tomaquagmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

Jun 4, 2016

Indigenous Lifeways series:
"Inspiration of a Native Glass Blower"
Featuring Native Glass Blower, Preston Singletary

Final Episode

In this episode of Indigenous Lifeways, Internationally recognized Glass Blowing artist Preston Singletary talks about his background and career in this discussion presented by the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology at Brown University.

Mr. Singletary discusses his relationship with western glass blowing traditions and Northwest native design. He takes us on a deeper discovery of other influences such as the study that he refers to as "Genetic Memory" and other ideas around navigating and analyzing your dreams. He speaks about the correlation to Native Vision quests. He presents various examples of his work and presents the background on many of his objects of which many are from his own traditional native influences.

Preston Singletary Website:http://prestonsingletary.com

Support Our Podcasts! Visit http://www.patreon.com/artways

Tomaquag Museum Website: http://www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Follow Us!

Twitter
Facebook

Is there a subject you would like us to cover or present?
E-mail Mike Johnson at mjohnson@tomaquagmuseum.org

 

Artist Preston Singletary Full Bio:

The art of Preston Singletary has become synonymous with the relationship between European glass blowing traditions and Northwest Native art. His artworks feature themes of transformation, animal spirits, and shamanism through elegant blown glass forms and mystical sand carved Tlingit designs.

Singletary learned the art of glass blowing by working with artists in the Seattle area including Benjamin Moore and Dante Marioni. As a student and assistant, he initially focused on mastering the techniques of the European tradition. His work took him to Kosta Boda (Sweden) where he studied Scandinavian design and met his future wife. Throughout his 30+ years of glass blowing experience, he has also had opportunities to learn the secrets of the Venetian glass masters by working with Italian legends Lino Tagliapietra, Cecco Ongaro, and Pino Signoretto. In 2010, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Arts degree from the University of Puget Sound.

Now recognized internationally, Singletary’s artworks are included in museum collections such as The British Museum (London, UK), The Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA), The Seattle Art Museum (Seattle WA), the Corning Museum of Glass (Corning, NY), the Mint Museum of Art and Design (Charlotte, NC), the Heard Museum (Phoenix, AZ), and the Smithsonian Institution (Washington, DC). Singletary maintains an active schedule by teaching and lecturing internationally. In 2009, the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, WA, launched a major mid-career survey of his work, entitled Preston Singletary: Echoes, Fire, and Shadows. This exhibition featured Clan House, his largest commission to date, and traveled to venues across North America.

May 22, 2016

Indigenous Lifeways series:
"Inspiration of a Native Glass Blower"
Featuring Native Glass Blower, Preston Singletary

Episode 2

In this episode of Indigenous Lifeways, Internationally recognized Glass Blowing artist Preston Singletary talks about his background and career in this discussion presented by the Haffenreffer Museum of Anthropology at Brown University.

Mr. Singletary discusses his relationship with western glass blowing traditions and Northwest native design. He takes us on a deeper discovery of other influences such as the study that he refers to as "Genetic Memory" and other ideas around navigating and analyzing your dreams. He speaks about the correlation to Native Vision quests. He presents various examples of his work and presents the background on many of his objects of which many are from his own traditional native influences.

Preston Singletary Website:http://prestonsingletary.com

Support Our Podcasts! Visit http://www.patreon.com/artways

Tomaquag Museum Website: http://www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Follow Us!

Twitter
Facebook

Is there a subject you would like us to cover or present?
E-mail Mike Johnson at mjohnson@tomaquagmuseum.org

 

Artist Preston Singletary Full Bio:

The art of Preston Singletary has become synonymous with the relationship between European glass blowing traditions and Northwest Native art. His artworks feature themes of transformation, animal spirits, and shamanism through elegant blown glass forms and mystical sand carved Tlingit designs.

Singletary learned the art of glass blowing by working with artists in the Seattle area including Benjamin Moore and Dante Marioni. As a student and assistant, he initially focused on mastering the techniques of the European tradition. His work took him to Kosta Boda (Sweden) where he studied Scandinavian design and met his future wife. Throughout his 30+ years of glass blowing experience, he has also had opportunities to learn the secrets of the Venetian glass masters by working with Italian legends Lino Tagliapietra, Cecco Ongaro, and Pino Signoretto. In 2010, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Arts degree from the University of Puget Sound.

Now recognized internationally, Singletary’s artworks are included in museum collections such as The British Museum (London, UK), The Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA), The Seattle Art Museum (Seattle WA), the Corning Museum of Glass (Corning, NY), the Mint Museum of Art and Design (Charlotte, NC), the Heard Museum (Phoenix, AZ), and the Smithsonian Institution (Washington, DC). Singletary maintains an active schedule by teaching and lecturing internationally. In 2009, the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, WA, launched a major mid-career survey of his work, entitled Preston Singletary: Echoes, Fire, and Shadows. This exhibition featured Clan House, his largest commission to date, and traveled to venues across North America.

May 15, 2016

Mr. Singletary discusses his relationship with western glass blowing traditions and Northwest native design. He takes us on a deeper discovery of other influences such as the study that he refers to as "Genetic Memory" and other ideas around navigating and analyzing your dreams. He speaks about the correlation to Native Vision quests. He presents various examples of his work and presents the background on many of his objects of which many are from his own traditional native influences.

Preston Singletary Website:http://prestonsingletary.com

Support Our Podcasts! Visit http://www.patreon.com/artways

Tomaquag Museum Website: http://www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Follow Us!

Twitter
Facebook

Is there a subject you would like us to cover or present?
E-mail Mike Johnson at mjohnson@tomaquagmuseum.org

 

Artist Preston Singletary Full Bio:

The art of Preston Singletary has become synonymous with the relationship between European glass blowing traditions and Northwest Native art. His artworks feature themes of transformation, animal spirits, and shamanism through elegant blown glass forms and mystical sand carved Tlingit designs. 

Singletary learned the art of glass blowing by working with artists in the Seattle area including Benjamin Moore and Dante Marioni. As a student and assistant, he initially focused on mastering the techniques of the European tradition. His work took him to Kosta Boda (Sweden) where he studied Scandinavian design and met his future wife. Throughout his 30+ years of glass blowing experience, he has also had opportunities to learn the secrets of the Venetian glass masters by working with Italian legends Lino Tagliapietra, Cecco Ongaro, and Pino Signoretto. In 2010, he was awarded an honorary Doctor of Arts degree from the University of Puget Sound. 

Now recognized internationally, Singletary’s artworks are included in museum collections such as The British Museum (London, UK), The Museum of Fine Arts (Boston, MA), The Seattle Art Museum (Seattle WA), the Corning Museum of Glass (Corning, NY), the Mint Museum of Art and Design (Charlotte, NC), the Heard Museum (Phoenix,  AZ), and the Smithsonian Institution (Washington, DC). Singletary maintains an active schedule by teaching and lecturing internationally. In 2009, the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, WA, launched a major mid-career survey of his work, entitled Preston Singletary: Echoes, Fire, and Shadows. This exhibition featured Clan House, his largest commission to date, and traveled to venues across North America.

May 10, 2016

 

This episode of Indigenous Lifeways features outtakes from one of the Amazing Authors tour stops in Cortez Colorado. Shown in this episode are David Feela, who writes and lives in Cortez Colorado, has monthly columns in The Four Corners Free Press and The Durango Telegraph. His mostly funny books include “Thought Experiments,” “The Home Atlas” and “How Delicate These Arches.”

Also featured is John Christian Hopkins a member of the Narragansett tribal nation in Rhode Island, who now lives in Arizona. He is a journalist, author, poet, teacher, humorist and public speaker. His writings are poignant, funny and sometimes irreverent. His novels include “Twilight of the Gods,” “Two Guns” and “Rhyme or Design: Narragansett Poetry.” John has also been a columnist for USA Today.

Tomaquag Museum thanks, John and Amazing authors for their kind donation to our podcast series.

About the Amazing Authors Tour:

The mission of the Amazing Authors Tour is to showcase engaging, amusing, fascinating and compelling regional writers from the Southwest who celebrate the cultural diversity of its inhabitants, communities, and landscapes. The tour began in October 2015 and featured Hopi elder Leroy Lewis and local author Lorna LaDage.

Resources to John Christian Hopkins work:

https://www.facebook.com/John-Christian-Hopkins-Fan-Page-144686789962/

http://authorjohnchopkins.blogspot.com/?view=sidebar

https://bluehandbooks.org

About Tomaquag Museum:

About Tomaquag Museum:

Tomaquag Museum, Rhode Island’s only museum entirely dedicated to telling the story of the Indigenous Peoples was established in 1958. It is a Native-led nonprofit museum. Tomaquag serves as a cultural bridge between the past, present and future as well as a facilitator between the Indigenous communities and the diverse world. Through our unique collection, lectures, tours, off-site programs, and arts & educator workshops, we educate the public regarding Native history, culture, arts, current events, and environmental issues.

Tomaquag Museum is one of 10 recipients of the 2016 National Medal for Museum and Library Service, the nation’s highest honor given to museums and libraries for service to the community.
The Museum is visited each year by artists, researchers, students, and travelers from across the United States and throughout the world.

For more information www.tomaquagmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook and Twitter

 

May 2, 2016

"Tradition & Innovation" is a look at indigenous traditional culture in a modern world. Featuring traditional and contemporary art pieces, this partnership with the Hera Gallery of south Kingstown Rhode island looks at how indigenous people retain ties to their traditions in a modern world. Examples of art produced by local native artists are featured followed by a lecture by Tomaquag Museum's Executive Director, Lorén Spears, who provides examples of leather, fur, and musical instruments used by native people. Lorén provides a wonderful blend of these examples explaining their use in the past, as well as how they are being used in today's modern times.


About Tomaquag Museum
Tomaquag Museum, Rhode Island’s only museum entirely dedicated to telling the story of the Indigenous Peoples was established in 1958. It is a Native-led nonprofit museum. Tomaquag serves as a cultural bridge between the past, present and future as well as a facilitator between the Indigenous communities and the diverse world.

Through our unique collection, lectures, tours, off-site programs, and arts & educator workshops, we educate the public regarding Native history, culture, arts, current events, and environmental issues. The Museum is visited each year by artists, researchers, students, and travelers from across the United States and throughout the world.

For more information, visit www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Social Media:
http://www.facebook.com/tomaquagmuseum

Twitter: @tomaquagmuseum

Tomaquag Museum can bring a custom program to your school or business. Contact us to find out how!

Phone: (401) 491-9063

E-mail: lorenspears@tomaquagmuseum.org

 

Apr 25, 2016


“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 10:

In this final episode of “College Native Style,” Lorén takes comments from the audience and discusses some of the work of Princess Red-Wing, a Wampanoag scholar, and one of the founders of Tomaquag Museum. We hope you have enjoyed this series and thank you for your interest and support of Tomaquag Museum!

This episode total running time: 4:30

For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
http://www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
http://www.patreon.com/artways



 

Apr 18, 2016


“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 10:

This episode discusses the availability of Narragansett Indian transcripts of “The Narragansett Dawn” written in 1936 - 38 through the University of Rhode Island Library Archives. Lorén explains the ideological differences between outside western thinking, to that of Indigenous ways. As an example, the differences in how Scientists and archeologists quantify history based only on what they see written vs How information is passed down orally in Indigenous culture.

This episode total running time: 8:38


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released Once a week. The series has a total of 11 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
http://www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
http://www.patreon.com/artways



 

Apr 11, 2016


“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 9:

This episode continues to look at different native publications by indigenous and non-indigenous authors, and the “Big Read” project. Lorén also discusses the concept of “detribalization”, and what has happened when the student leaves to go to school and return home to their reservations and their people.


This episode total running time: 7:30


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released Once a week. The series has a total of 11 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
http://www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
http://www.patreon.com/artways



 

Apr 4, 2016


“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 8:

This episode looks at Tribal Colleges and universities which are both integral and essential to their communities. They serve a variety of people, from young adults to senior citizens, American Indians to non-American Indians. Loren begins to explore various literature resources that people can find, especially for professors.

This episode total running time: 5:10


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released Once a week. The series has a total of 11 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
www.patreon.com/artways



 

Mar 28, 2016

“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 7 :

This episode looks at ways non-native students can be open minded towards fellow native students, and to be respectful. We look at reasons people don’t understand indigenous Cultural, how it perpetuates negative experiences. We also look at an example how it took a Whitehouse initiative to improve tribal colleges and universities to give them equal access to resources that other mainstream colleges have.

This episode total running time: 4:30


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released once a week. The series has a total of 10 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
www.patreon.com/artways

Mar 20, 2016


“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 6:

Loren provides more discussion on cultural identity. She provides examples of the need for native students to be close to family, and places that are familiar to them. She describes the connectedness of tribal families, and what makes up a tribal community. We also discuss issues found on college campuses that make it harder for Native students to feel comfortable going to a university.

This episode total running time: 6:15


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released twice a week. The series has a total of 10 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
www.patreon.com/artways



 

Mar 16, 2016

In episode 5:

In this episode, we give examples of education which involves schools that infuse native American culture into its curriculums. Many indigenous education institutions and educators realize that not all knowledge comes from a book. We give examples of why it is important to critique a book carefully and try to find books that are written about an indigenous culture by native American authors. This episode will also describe native colleges, and how they differ from mainstream college institutions. Why is is better in some cases for native students?

This episode total running time: 8:30


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released twice a week. The series has a total of 10 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
www.patreon.com/artways

Mar 13, 2016

“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 4:

Discussion continues in defining gaps in indigenous education. The social problems within Indian communities around public education. The effect of colonialism and the definition of “Historical Trauma. Why there is a fear of school, and also why it is considered (in a sense) a method used to take away indigenous culture and is sometimes considered as a means to get Native people to assimilate to colonial culture. This is explained from a familial perspective.

This episode total running time: 7:30


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released twice a week. The series has a total of 10 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
www.patreon.com/artways

Mar 9, 2016

“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 3:

In this discussion, we take a look at different forms of bias. From Racial, cultural, and social/economic, and how this affects native kids and students.

This episode total running time: 10:30


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released twice a week. The series has a total of 10 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
www.patreon.com/artways



 

Mar 7, 2016

 


“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In episode 2:

We share more education statistics with some positive numbers. We look at comparisons around the available resources to native students in Rhode Island VS. other reservations across the country.

The discussion also covers what some of the gaps are that are present for native students, and we define specifically what these gaps are.

This episode total running time: 7:36


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released twice a week. The series has a total of 10 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
www.tomaquagmuseum.org

Please consider supporting our podcasts! Please visit our patreon page at:
www.patreon.com/artways

 

 

Feb 28, 2016

“College Native Style” is a lecture led by Tomaquag Museum executive director Lorén Spears. The subject focuses on Indigenous Peoples, who think about things generally very differently than that of the western European mindset.

This series explores the many facets of an indigenous person, and the challenges they can sometimes face in the education system. This series is aimed to be a good guide for other educators, and for those who are looking to broaden their understanding of Indigenous people and their culture.

In this episode:

Lorén opens lecture speaking in her Narragansett Language

You will hear a traditional Narragansett welcome song….

We share some statistic about native kids in the education system that may shock you.

This episode total running time: 7:35


New Episodes of our “College Native Style” series are released twice a week. The series has a total of 10 episodes.


For more information about Tomaquag Museum, please visit our website at:
www.tomaquagmuseum.org

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Dec 28, 2015

In this episode of Indigenous Artways, we present "The Flute Teacher", which is one story about the courting flute, and how men would have flutes made so that they could attract a women who they were interested in dating or "Courting". Instruction is provided by Wesly Jenkins, a flute player and teacher.

Please consider supporting our podcast! Please visit: www.patreon.com/artways

The Indigenous Artways podcast is produced by Tomaquag Museum is Rhode Islands only native american museum. to find out more, please visit our website at: www.tomaquagmuseum.com.

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